Rush Center for Congenital Heart Disease

Rush Medical College is named for Benjamin Rush, a physician from Pennsylvania who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Rush Medical College was chartered in 1837 and opened officially on December 4, 1843, with 22 students enrolled in a 16-week course. During its first century of operation, more than 10,000 physicians received their training at Rush Medical College. The college was affiliated with the University of Chicago from 1898 until 1942, when it temporarily suspended its educational program, though it continued its corporate existence.

Its faculty continued undergraduate and graduate teaching of medicine and the biological sciences as members of the faculty of the University of Illinois. In 1969, the medical college became part of the Medical Center and reactivated its charter. The college reopened in 1971 and achieved full enrollment by 1976. Since 1971, the college has awarded more than 3,900 doctor of medicine degrees.

 

Rush University Pediatric Cardiology Fellowships

The Center for Congenital and Structural Heart Diseases at Rush University provide fellowship training in general pediatric cardiology as well as in interventional pediatric cardiology.  This program provides the most advanced training in pediatric cardiology and interventional pediatric cardiology.  Faculty members are world renowned for the expertise in their fields and in teaching the next generations pediatric cardiology and interventional procedures.   In addition, this program provides its trainees golden and unique opportunities through two prestigious venues:  the Pediatric Interventional Cardiac Symposium (PICS) and Pediatric Cardiology, a world leading journal dedicated to this field.

 

 

     

Pediatric Cardiology

An international journal, Pediatric Cardiology, is dedicated to the discipline of heart diseases in children. The journal is edited by Dr. Ra-id Abdulla and is published by Springer-New York. Dr. Abdulla is Professor of Pediatrics at Rush University and the Program Director of Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship program. 

Pediatric cardiology is a monthly publication with manuscript submission and readership worldwide.  Several of the faculty members are members of the journal's Editorial Board  and interested fellows participate in the review process and the editorial function of the journal. Many previous fellows who demonstrated excellence in this process have joined the editorial board and were able to develop new features for the journal.  This optional experience provide a unique "insider" understanding of the world of academic medical publishing.

 

Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship

The pediatric cardiology fellowship program at Rush University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).  Fellowship training in general pediatric cardiology is a 3 year training program aimed to provide fellows with comprehensive learning of the science and art of pediatric cardiology.  All fields within pediatric cardiology are covered in this structured, well mentored and monitored training program.  Fellows are trained through a series of increasingly more intensive training in clinical, didactic and research fields of this medical specialty.

Fellows accepted to this program are expected to have completed training in an ACGME accredited pediatrics program and are Board Eligible in Pediatrics.

Fellowship Rotations

In-Patient/Echocardiography

Details:  Fellows provide care to pediatric cardiology patients in the NICU and general pediatric floors as well as perform echocardiographic studies for in-patient cases.  These patients include those in the wards, NICU and emergency room as well as in-patients on other services requiring pediatric cardiology consultation.  Fellows rotating through this service work with the in-patient supervising Faculty member in conjunction with the team of pediatric residents caring for these patients.  The pathology encountered by fellows in this rotation include the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired pediatric cardiology diseases, these patients tend to be in stable or semi stable conditions, more critical patients are admitted to the Cardiac ICU.  Pediatric cardiology patients admitted to the floor are cared for by one of 2 general pediatric teams in conjunction with the pediatric cardiology fellow and attending.  Patients admitted to the floor are either transferred from the CICU as they become more stable, or are children with pediatric cardiology ailments who require hospitalization for minor or intermediate type problems such as; arrhythmia, adjustment of medications, or the performance of minor diagnostic and therapeutic measures.  NICU patients are all newborn children with congenital heart disease.  The main role of the pediatric cardiology team in this setting is to provide an accurate diagnosis and establish a treatment plan leading to repair or discharge.  Consults from the emergency room and other services vary in their scope.  The goal is to provide a diagnosis and management plan to children with cardiac problems as a secondary issue.  In addition, fellows perform selected echocardiograms from the in-patient population.  Fellows start their echo rotations with didactic study of the principals of echocardiography, followed by supervised procedure sessions mentored by faculty and experienced sonographers, until they are comfortable performing studies independently.

Educational Goals:  Provide fellows with exposure to pediatric cardiology problems in an in-patient setting as well as the art of performing and interpreting echocardiography in pediatrics.  The spectrum of pathology encountered in this rotation spans the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired heart diseases, including those with complex cardiac anatomy.  The objective of this rotation is management of patients who are stable or semi-stable with emphasis on transitioning care from in-patient to out-patient and enable fellows to eventually conduct echocardiographic studies independently.   

Number of rotations:  8 in-patient/echo rotations spread throughout the 3 years of fellowship training.  Fellows are given increasing independence and supervisory role to pediatric residents and medical students as they progress in seniority in their fellowship training.

Supervision and Assessment:  Pediatric cardiology fellows performing in-patient/echo rotations are supervised by the attending on service.  Four attendings function as in-patient/echo attendings.  Fellows are assessed at the end of each rotation through an electronic evaluation system (MedHub) which allows fellows and faculty to assess each other in an anonymous fashion.  Faculty provide direct guidance throughout the rotation and fellows are encouraged to continually provide feed back regarding rotations.

 

Cardiac Intensive Care (CICU)

Details:  Fellows provide care to pediatric cardiology patients in the CICU.  These patients are those with congenital and acquired heart disease who are in critical or unstable conditions.  Fellows rotating through this service work with the CICU team of physicians, surgeons and nurses caring for these patients.  The pathology encountered by fellows in this rotation include the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired pediatric cardiology diseases, many of these patients have undergone surgical repair of congenital heart disease.  Unlike other rotations, fellows take in-house calls while in the CICU.  Call frequency is 1 in 4 and the 80 hour work week is strictly enforced.

Educational Goals:  Provide fellows with exposure to pediatric cardiology problems in unstable and critically ill children with congenital heart disease.

Number of rotations:  8 CICU rotations spread throughout the 3 years of fellowship training.  Fellows are given increasing independence and supervisory role to pediatric residents and medical students as they progress in seniority in their fellowship training.

Supervision and Assessment:   Fellows are supervised and assessed by the faculty members of the CICU.  These attendings include pediatric cardiologists, pediatric intensivists and anesthesiologists as well as pediatric cardiovascular surgeons.
 

Cardiac Catheterization / Electrophysiology

Details:  Fellows participate in all diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterizations.  They have a greater role in diagnostic procedures than with therapeutic procedures.  As the fellow advances in training they are expected to be independent when performing cardiac catheterizations, particularly those of diagnostic nature.  Every Thursday, fellows join the electrophysiology lab to participate in invasive EP studies.  

Educational Goals:  Be able to perform independently both, diagnostic catheterization procedures and simple therapeutic procedures with good understanding of high end invasive and EP procedures.

Number of rotations:  6 cath/EP rotations spread throughout the 3 years of fellowship training.  Fellows are given increasing independence as they progress in seniority in their fellowship training.

Supervision and Assessment:   Fellows are supervised and assessed by cath and EP faculty members.  Fellows and faculty review all studies performed by fellows weekly to provide guidance and critique.  Ongoing assessment as well as monthly assessment through MedHub are provided for the fellows.

 

Out-Patient Continuity Clinic

Details:  Fellows provide care to pediatric cardiology patients on the out-patient service.  Fellows attend one half day clinic with the same attending throughout the 3 years of fellowship.  The faculty member services as a mentor for the fellow.  Fellows accumulate their own patients to see in their clinics during their fellowship as well as see patients with their mentor during these clinic sessions.  Fellows are expected to attend all clinic days regardless of what rotation they are serving.

Educational Goals:  Provide fellows with exposure to pediatric cardiology problems in the out-patient settings.  The spectrum of pathology encountered in this rotation spans the entire spectrum of congenital and acquired heart diseases, including those with complex cardiac anatomy.  The emphasis in this rotation is management of patients who are stable.

Number of rotations:  N/A

Supervision and Assessment:  Pediatric cardiology fellows performing in-patient rotations are supervised by the attending on service.  One attending function is out-patient mentor.  Faculty provide direct guidance throughout the rotation and fellows are encouraged to continually provide feedback regarding the rotation.
 

Research

Masters in Clinical Research at Rush University

All first year fellows enroll in the Maters in Clinical Research program at Rush University.  This is paid by the fellowship program.  Fellows attend didactic lectures (twice a week from 3-5 pm) for one year.  The research project conducted for fellowship purpose during the 2nd and 3rd years of fellowship counts towards the research mandate for the masters degree since it is supervised by a scholarly oversight committee which ensures that the research project completed counts towards Pediatric Cardiology Board eligibility as well as the masters degree.

Details:  Fellows discuss in their first year their research interest with their mentors and design a project with their mentor leading to completion of this research project and publication of an original article within their fellowship training years.  

Educational Goals:  Learn how to formulate a research project, develop a hypothesis, design methodology and complete a research project within the time provided.

Number of rotations:  10 months of research is provided as a single block, in addition, one month during first year is provided to allow the fellow to choose a project as well as another month during their senior year to allow completion of their manuscript writing.  The additional 2 months are typically on part-time bases during one of their clinical rotations.

Supervision and Assessment:   Fellows are supervised and assessed by a research faculty mentor.  Fellows and faculty review all studies performed by fellows daily to provide guidance and critique.  Ongoing assessment as well as monthly assessment through MedHub are provided for the fellows.

 

Electives: Cardiac Pathology & Others

Fellows are provided with 2-week blocks taken from other rotations to allow them to experience unique rotations such as cardiac pathology and electives of their choice such as MRI.  Fellows discuss and plan such rotations with their mentors and Program Director.

Unique Educational Opportunities in Pediatric Cardiology at Rush University

The Center for Congenital and Structural Heart Diseases at Rush University houses two important and internationally renowned educational institutions.  One is the Pediatric Cardiology Interventional Symposium (PICS) and the Pediatric Cardiology journal.

 

Call Responsibilities

Fellows are on call one weekend night per week and one full weekend per month, call is from home.  Fellows take call responsibilities during 2/3rd of their training at Rush and have a total of one year of their training call free.  Rush University and the pediatric cardiology fellowship program at Rush closely observe and strictly monitor the 80-hour on-call rules as mandated by the ACGME.

The following guidelines, consistent with the ACGME’s Common Program Requirements, delineate the policy that the Rush University Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Training Program will adhere to.

1.  Duty Hours

a.     Duty hours will be limited to 80 hours per week, averaged over a four-week period, inclusive of all in-house call activities

b.     As a minimum, fellows shall be provided with 1 day (a continuous 24-hour period) in 7 free from all educational and clinical responsibilities, averaged over a 4-week period, inclusive of call.

c.      Adequate time for rest and personal activities will be provided.  This will consist of an 18-hour time period provided between all daily duty periods and after in-house call.

2.  On-Call Activities

a.     Pediatric cardiology fellows are on call during 8 of the 13 rotations (each rotation is 4 weeks long).  The remaining 5 rotations are without call.  Call frequency is one day per 4-day cycle.  The call is in-house. 

b.     Continuous on-site duty, including in-house call, must not exceed 24 consecutive hours.  Residents may remain on duty for up to 4 additional hours beyond the 24 hours (for total of 28 hours) to participate in didactic activities, transfer care of patients, conduct outpatient clinics and maintain continuity of medical care.  Residents will leave post-call by 12 noon.

c.      No new patients will be accepted after 24 continuous hours on duty by the fellow on call. A new patient is defined as any patient for whom the fellow has not previously provided care.

Every effort will be made by the Program Director, faculty, and trainees to maintain strict compliance with the above guidelines.  This policy is disseminated yearly to all program faculty and staff.

Violations of above policy will be reported to Program Director and University authorities.  Proper contact information will be provided yearly to all fellows and made available on fellowship website and telephone directory.

 

Interventional Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program

The general pediatric cardiology fellowship at Rush University is an ACGME accredited program.  Interventional pediatric cardiology is a recognized training by the ACGME, however, there is no accreditation process available for this higher sub-specialization.  The interventional pediatric cardiology training is for 1 year.  This program will use the same resources and facilities as the pediatric cardiology fellowship program at Rush’s Center for Congenital and Structural Heart Diseases.  Candidates to this training program must have had completed training in pediatric cardiology or adult cardiology fellowship.  Trainees of both ACGME accredited or international programs in pediatric or adult cardiology are considered.

Fellows complete 12 months of cardiac catheterization/interventional rotations.  Clinical research will be conducted during clinical rotations.  Call responsibilities are shared with the general pediatric cardiology fellows (1 in 4 in-house calls).

 

Pediatric Cardiology & pediatric Cardiology Interventional Fellowship Application

Applicants interested in applying should click on the link below and complete the Society of Pediatric Cardiology Training Program Directors Uniform Fellowship Application. 

 

 

Application

Application to pediatric cardiology fellowship at Rush University is done through ERAS

  • Go to:  www.eras.com

  • Select “ERAS for Applicants”

  • Select “ERAS for Applicants”

  • Register for fellowship application

  • Eras will then send you though the ERAS Fellowship Documents Office (EFDO) electronic tokens to apply to fellowship programs.

  • Once the applicant receives the electronic token, proceed to the MyERAS web site https://services.aamc.org/eras/myeras/  to register, and begin working on his application.

     

Candidates must be graduates of approved medical schools and be eligible for licensure to practice medicine in the State of Illinois.

*For temporary licensure in Illinois, if you have graduated from a medical school more than 2 years prior to the date of application for licensure, and are not actively engaged in the practice of medicine or engaged in a formal program of medical education in another state, territory, country, or province, in addition to meeting all requirements for licensure, you must submit acceptable documentation evidencing continuing clinical skills since graduation from medical school.

Applicants should apply by December 15th for positions sought July 1st 18 months later.  Interviews are usually held in March-May.  If you have any questions, please contact: 

Molly Rose Elkins-Ryan
Fellowship Coordinator
Rush Center for Congenital and Structural Heart Disease
Rush University Medical Center
1653 W. Congress Parkway, Suite 761 Jones
Chicago, IL  60612
Phone:  312.942.3254
Fax:  312.942.9325
mollyrose_elkins-ryan@rush.edu